Conference Programme

The CitiesIPCC Cities and Climate Change Science Conference

The CitiesIPCC Cities & Climate Change Science Conference is a multi-day programme filled with inspiring plenary sessions, thematic parallel sessions, and scientific poster sessions. Learn more about the activities in each day of the conference below.

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  • Day 1

    March 4, 2018

  • Day 2

    March 5, 2018

  • Day 3

    March 6, 2018

  • Day 4

    March 7, 2018

  • 13:00 - 17:30
    Indigenous knowledge holders (including youth and elders), their allies and practitioners, will share their understanding of climate change and its consequences for Indigenous urban and rural populations, as well as explore approaches to developing adaptation solutions to increase Indigenous communities' climate change resilience. This session will incorporate traditional ceremony, inspiring presentations, and knowledge sharing, and will be followed by a circle dance and tasting of traditional foods. The session will be organized into three Sharing Circles: 1. How we view the climate crises: building bridges between knowledge holders, a case example, and the Blackfoot perspective. 2. Global North and South Indigenous Knowledge sharing: operationalizing the process, a case example from South Africa and Canada. 3. Indigenous urban-rural relationships as a component of climate change resilience. Results of this pre-session will be synthesized and incorporated into the concurrent session titled "Application of Multiple Knowledge Systems for Evidence-based Decision Making: Opportunities and Challenges for Ensuring Resilient Communities under Climate Change".
    Theme 1

  • 08:30 - 10:00
    Opening Plenary in Hall D
    Where
    Hall D

  • 10:00 - 10:30
    Media Opportunities
    Where
    Room 4, Meeting Level

  • 10:30 - 12:00
    The Paris Agreement on Climate Change, Sustainable Development Goals, New Urban Agenda, and Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction are seeking to construct a new development trajectory. These global commitments both require – and will be supported by addressing climate change in cities. In this Plenary, we exchange knowledge, lessons, and experiences on the impacts of climate change on cities and how cities (their local governments, businesses, and citizens) are adapting and responding to climate change. The Theme 1 Plenary seeks to map the mitigation and adaptation knowledge needs and the gaps being experienced by cities in the context of realizing global commitments. Through interactive dialogue, the Plenary addresses the costs and benefits of climate action and inaction; the underpinning of ethics, equity, and climate justice in the context of climate change, the role of city residents as agents of change, and the imperatives for actions that achieve low carbon, climate-resilient urban pathways, and sustainable development.
    Theme 1
    Where
    Hall D

  • 13:00 - 14:30
    The objective of this session is to present the imperatives for cities actions arising from the need to achieve the leading global initiatives. Cities and urban areas have been thrust into the spotlight as a primary source of change and action for combatting the growing global threat of climate change. Understanding how cities can impact this global trajectory is imperative. Theme 1 of the Cities and Climate Change Science Conference emphasizes these Imperatives for Action. In particular, Subtheme 1.1: Urban Climate Mitigation and Adaptation, with specific focus on the Paris Agreement, the Sendai Framework (DRR), the New Urban Agenda, and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), examines the role cities have in these global agendas. The session will bring together professionals and conduct interactive dialogue focusing on these initiatives to discuss how cities can impact the global trajectory through the commitments and impacts cities have undertaken, the key gaps in knowledge and implementation of these issues, and the interdependencies and un-explored linkages these initiatives have in advancing action on climate change.
    Theme 1
    Where
    Salon 5

  • 13:00 - 14:30
    This session invites contributions from scientists, practitioners and policy makers working on solutions to implement the international 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in cities globally, including the Sustainable Development Goals, the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, and the New Urban Agenda. bring together practitioners, policy makers, academics and city representatives to: • Provide a review and highlight the wealth of evidence available from the practitioner community and how this can be collated; • Examine how practitioner knowledge and evidence can be better incorporated into the IPCC and wider scientific process. • Examine how the practitioner, policy and scientific community can foster collaboration • Discuss the components required to establish a partnership-based platform to collate and disseminate information. This session will demonstrate the implications of “what if” scenarios in a visually stimulating manner, using state of the art modelling tools, to demonstrate for example “what if City X was redeveloped and densified such that populations increased by 30% in the next decade, where would the risks exist, what are the potential impacts, how these could affect the people living, working, visiting the city, and how resilience could be embedded to the system of systems which makes up a community.
    Theme 1
    Where
    Salon 6

  • 13:00 - 14:30
    iDoc is an Energy Humanities (EH) research undertaking of the $75 million Future Energy Systems (FES) initiative at the University of Alberta. iDoc showcases the knowledge of scientists, cities, activists, policymakers, and citizens, by examining the work of FES teams. The intermedia documentary process probes possible energy systems futures and the technologies envisioned by the teams that they imagine will get us there. iDoc also connects to other FES Energy Humanities (EH) projects--"Speculative Energy Futures", and "Transition in Energy, Culture and Society"--as well as the SSHRC-funded "Feminist Energy Futures: Power Shift and Environmental Social Justice". Each EH project applies systems and social impact analysis through innovative, interdisciplinary methodology. iDoc research mobilizes an updated social science methodology known as the Fogo method (a dialogue created by exchanging moving image recordings). The Fogo method reciprocally shares recorded discussions among relevant community members, policy-makers, and researchers, to move towards resolution of seemingly intractable problems.
    Theme 1
    Where
    Salon 8

  • 13:00 - 14:30
    As the economic impact of natural catastrophes due to climate change grows, cities worldwide struggle with how to best invest to protect municipal assets and residential properties, and to adapt and prepare for other often-unexpected adverse affects. At the same time, private companies, property insurers and residents raise concerns about their capacity to absorb the increasing risk. In this context, innovative approaches to financing climate protection are required, which are more collaborative, engaging private companies and the insurance industry alongside city government, and with opportunity for resident input, to ensure judicious use of finite resources. The format for this session would be a panel discussion with international representatives from the scientific, practice and policy communities all contributing their insights on how to foster more inclusive dialogues amongst city actors and financiers to ensure more judicious use of local-level resources for climate mitigation, adaptation and protection. By taking an interdisciplinary approach and including scientific, practice and policy voices on the session panel, the session will contribute to the main conference goal of adding to both academic and practice-based knowledge related to cities and climate change.
    Theme 1
    Where
    Salon 9

  • 13:00 - 14:30
    Meeting the challenges of climate change in cities will increasingly require engaging with the issue of urban informality. More than a billion urban dwellers are estimated to live in what are often termed informal settlements; while a high proportion of the economically active population in urban areas of the Global South work in what is termed the ‘informal economy’. Residents of informal settlements face high levels of climate-related risk as a result of poor quality buildings and occupying land that is exposed to a range of hazards, and achieving low carbon urban development will require meaningful engagement with informal sector livelihoods. All of these strategies will need to be built on an inclusive view of the city, in which both the process of participation in setting agendas and priorities, and the equity of the outcomes of these processes will be critical. The papers in this session examine the political economy of vulnerability and resilience in informal settlements in Africa, South Asia and the Pacific Islands. They explore the multiple dimensions of social marginalization and how these shape risk, and describe approaches emerging strategies that are being taken to foster greater inclusion in responding to climate change.
    Theme 1
    Where
    Salon 10

  • 13:00 - 14:30
    Cities in emerging economies face multiple challenges to address economic development needs, local environmental loss, poor-infrastructure and climate resilience, amongst increasing contributions to global GHGs. This is further accentuated by low performance of these cities on parameters of social development, equity, functional autonomy and financial capacity. In the last decade or so, co-benefits approach has proved to be a key mechanism that provides both vertical cross-linkages between institutions (global, national and local objectives) on the one end and horizontal interactions between mitigation and adaptation related policy sectors on the other. Paris Agreement, Urban SDGs, the New Urban Agenda, Sendai Framework emphasize greater collaboration between diverse communities, multi-level institutions and development sectors to co-generate positive impacts. It thus becomes crucial to assess the practical experience of co-benefits- lessons learned, scientific tools, knowledge gaps in the emerging economies with the overarching aim to discern policy imperatives that moderate current unsustainable pathways of urbanization. The session presents the application of co-benefits as an approach in India, China, Brazil, Turkey, South Africa & Indonesia, which together comprise about half of global urban population, underpinning how to promote climate action based on scientific tools, different experiences and gaps identified so far.
    Theme 1
    Where
    Salon 11

  • 13:00 - 14:30
    A collaborative session that will explore the challenges, opportunities, and best practices of braiding Indigenous and scientific knowledge systems to inform climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies and programs, particularly as they relate to enhancing resilience of the interdependent urban and rural Indigenous populations. The session will involve representatives from the Government of Alberta, Alberta’s First Nations and Métis communities, Indigenous experts from around the world, and IPCC experts in developing specific recommendations for the IPCC research agenda.
    Theme 1
    Where
    Salon 12

  • 13:00 - 14:00
    Media Opportunities
    Where
    Room 4, Meeting Level

  • 14:45 - 16:15
    Climate change is acknowledged as the largest threat to our societies in the coming decades. As urban areas house highly diverse people with differing vulnerabilities, climate change is likely to shift the focus of discussions from a general urban perspective to who in cities will be affected by climate change, adaptation and mitigation, and how. This brings the urban equity question to the forefront. This session highlights pressing equity and environmental justice issues in cities under climate change. This involves key inputs from research (e.g. UCCRN), communities (UPROSE, NY, Métis and First Nations Indigenous peoples, the urban energy disadvantaged), and policy informants (NYC-EJA, Métis and First Nations Indigenous governments). These key inputs are discussed among presenters, and the audience using the guiding questions. This session identifies major research and knowledge gaps related to equity issues under climate change. For example, a key research gap is the sustainable transformation of the urban energy systems in a manner that avoids exacerbating impacts on groups that already have a limited capacity to adapt. This session also touches on the challenges and gaps in the solution space between indigenous communities, indigenous traditional knowledge, and policy-making.
    Theme 1
    Where
    Salon 5

  • 14:45 - 16:15
    This session will draw upon learning from the emerging case of We Are Still In, a network of non-state actors and supporting NGOs in the United States. We Are Still In emerged as a network of networks representing local governments, business, states, and academia in response to the U.S. Federal Government’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement. The inaction and opposition to address climate change from the Federal Government has created a new imperative that these sectors, particularly cities, do more. Without a supportive legislative environment or significant resources from the national government, U.S. cities must form new partnerships to fill the knowledge, policy, and financial gaps. New understanding in information science and social science can be derived from the collaboration of cities and non-state actors. These stakeholders need to understand what are the right questions to ask of the scientific community. They need to be able to apply research findings from resources accessible to policy-makers and practitioners. This diverse panel will present a bold new platform for multi-stakeholder collaboration; new case studies and a framework to be examined by scientific analysis on enabling environments and transformative action; and help guide the development of scientific research with applied potential in cities around these topics.
    Theme 1
    Where
    Salon 6

  • 14:45 - 16:15
    Cities are leading the transition to a sustainable economy. Cities are increasingly setting low carbon goals and implementing local policies that recognize sustainability as essential to new markets, jobs and creating attractive places to live and work. However, cities are under more pressure than ever. Housing 50% of the world’s population and growing – core resources are under pressure. Furthermore, a changing climate is adding to the problem threatening energy, water and land security. To continue moving towards a sustainable economy, cities need to focus on good governance and invest in the services and projects that make an impact. A significant challenge in achieving this goal is access and ability to use big data. City leaders need data to understand how to build smarter and more sustainable cites, assess climate vulnerabilities and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. For climate data to be useful in cities – scientists, technologists and researches must work closely with urban planners and policy makers. This session will explore where the opportunities and challenges are in the era of smart cities, big data and analytics. Our speakers will discuss how cities can tap into this wealth of data and gain new insights into people’s behaviors and responses to climate change. Examples of emerging innovations in data collection, analysis and visualizations will be presented to understand how they can support and empower cities to enhance their resilience to climate change.
    Theme 2
    Where
    Salon 8

  • 14:45 - 16:15
    Climate change and air pollution are interrelated in ways that are relevant for cities. Climate change can influence air pollution through changes in meteorology, whereas air pollutant emissions themselves can influence regional climate as short-lived climate pollutants. Perhaps most importantly, most actions to decrease greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduce air pollutant emissions from the same sources, leading to important co-benefits for air quality and health. Since ambient air pollution is responsible for about 4.5 million premature deaths globally each year, actions to slow climate change will have significant benefits for global health. As cities work toward air quality and climate mitigation goals, there is opportunity to plan to address both problems simultaneously. This session aims to improve understanding of the links between air pollution, climate change, and public health, and from past efforts to quantify co-benefits with a focus on developing effective policies. Further, we hope to learn from the experience of city practitioners about how co-benefits can and have been used successfully to motivate GHG emission reductions and air quality improvements. We will also discuss opportunities for joint air pollutant/GHG emissions inventories and how air quality and health co-benefits can be estimated and delivered in practice, and ways to strengthen that capacity.
    Theme 2
    Where
    Salon 9

  • 14:45 - 16:15
    To help local governments achieve their climate-related objectives, city networks have an increasingly prominent role in providing support and guidance with decision-making and technical activities. Such elements require strong policy-practitioner interactions, yet there can often be disconnect between researchers, policy-makers and practitioners when understanding the challenges and solutions to transition to a sustainable future. Thus, this session will aim at: 1) Providing an overview of how city networks can effectively support the integration of climate science into decision-making processes and planning; 2) Identifying gaps in existing climate data (availability, quality, accessibility and applicability) in various local governments, in order to provide feedback on how the 6th Assessment Report (AR6) could better support and enable local governments to reduce GHG emissions and improve resiliency, and; 3) Providing pathways that will foster more efficient researcher-practitioners-policy-makers interactions, as well as co-production of knowledge so that climate science can readily respond to the needs of local governments and support their climate actions. Panelists and delegates will engage in a participatory conversation on how climate science is applied by local governments, as well as exploring how city networks can support them in assessing their vulnerability to climate-change impacts by fostering stronger interactions between researchers, practitioners and policy-makers.
    Theme 2
    Where
    Salon 10

  • 14:45 - 16:15
    As interest in the emissions profile of cities has grown, so has the range of stakeholders and use-cases for the data included in a community-scale GHG inventory. In many cases inventories are built around “best available” activity data rather than data tailored for a particular purpose. As multi-year data from cities emerges, limitations of certain data for understanding progress and performance management are coming into sharper focus. Meanwhile novel approaches for direct measurement of gases emanating from cities are maturing and offer insight into these challenges.
    Theme 2
    Where
    Salon 11

  • 14:45 - 16:15
    To maintain or improve the quality of living in cities, urban planners need detailed information on future urban climates at a residential scale but most of the global climate models do not adequately account for the urban environment. In fact, cities affect the local weather by perturbing the wind, temperature, moisture, turbulence, and surface energy budgets. The foundation of urban-scale climate information is our current high-resolution urban downscaling expertise, combined with local-impact models, and ensemble dynamical and statistical downscaling. This combination enables the propagation of climate change and uncertainty from global to the city scale. The first part of this session will address critical knowledge gaps around downscaling to city-scales and how to assess and reduce uncertainties; this will be critical input to the forthcoming IPCC scientific assessments. Complementing this focus on models, the session will also look at observations. The Global Climate Observing System Terrestrial Observation Panel for Climate (GCOS-TOPC) is responsible for identifying and facilitating the monitoring of Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) that feed into IPCC/UNFCCC climate assessments. GCOS-TOPC is responsible for several critical ECVs including global surface albedo, land cover change and soil moisture, and as a matter of priority is currently considering one or more ECVs that represent evolving human adaptation to climate change in critical terrestrial realms, including cities. Through a facilitated panel and audience interaction, the second part of this session aims to make important progress on the identification of such ECVs and how they may be efficiently measured/monitored.  Such variables representing urban adaptation might be physical (e.g. changed urban characteristics from satellite observation), or socio-economic (e.g. direct funding invested in adaptation response). Development of appropriate city-related ECVs will be a lasting legacy of this Cities IPCC Conference.   
    Theme 2
    Where
    Salon 12

  • 16:30 - 18:00
    As centers for population, infrastructure and economic activities, cities are key contributors to global emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) and short-lived climate pollutants (SLCP) as well as key hot spots of climate change impacts and vulnerabilities. Understanding the processes and interlinkages of climate science, emissions, impacts, risks and vulnerabilities are central for co-producing strategies and alternatives to adapt to and mitigate climate change. The science of cities can guide the reduction of GHG and SLCP emissions, climate vulnerability, differential risks and help improve resilience. The analysis of social processes driving the construction and reconstruction of urban space, of urban form, design, typology, and policies are also key considerations. Contributions to better understanding the science and practice of cities in the context of climate change have expanded significantly in recent years. However, there are few forums creating opportunities to assess these contributions. The Theme 2 Plenary creates a platform to create an interactive dialogue on these issues incorporating scientific, policy, and practitioner’s knowledge.
    Theme 2
    Where
    Hall D

  • 08:30 - 09:00
    New research by C40 Cities, the University of Leeds, University of New South Wales, and Arup examines the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with goods and services consumed by residents of cities such as food, clothing, electronic equipment, airplane travel, delivery trucks and construction industries. The findings reveal a detailed picture of the supply chains and sphere of impact that mayors, businesses and citizens can potentially influence with their climate action. C40 Cities Executive Director, Mark Watts, and his team, will present the findings of the innovative new analysis, and the implications for mayors and city authorities around the world. Media Contact: Josh Harris, jharris@c40.org
    Media Opportunities
    Where
    Room 4, Meeting Level

  • 09:00 - 10:30
    Given the scale of impacts and vulnerabilities, it is evident that cities need transformative action across adaptation, mitigation, and sustainable development strategies. This is especially challenging in cities because of the inertia built into infrastructures, technologies, institutions, cultural and behavioural norms. Re-design of urban infrastructure and the built environment especially in informal settlements, disruptive technologies, and faster mainstreaming of innovations, must be coupled with political leadership, more integrated approaches to governance, and behavioral change. The Theme 3 Plenary will hear from policy-makers, scientists and practitioners from around the world to stimulate a dialogue on these challenges.
    Theme 3
    Where
    Hall D

  • 11:00 - 12:30
    As the climate warms, a breadth of human health issues is being exasperated ranging from heat exposure, to insect and airborne diseases, to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. However, it is difficult to both quantify the costs associated with climate change impacting human health and, at the same time, the benefits to human health resulting from climate change mitigation options. This session will explore the human health implications of climate change, how the impacts effect different socio-economic categories, methods to incorporate the costs associated with human heath into climate change impacts, quantifying the human health benefits and impacts of climate change mitigation options, and case studies of cities taking action on climate change that result in benefits to human health.
    Theme 2
    Where
    Salon 5

  • 11:00 - 12:30
    Currently, 48% and 71% of the infrastructure for Mombasa and Lamu islands In Kenya respectively falls within the Low Elevation Coastal Zones (LECZ) of less than 10m thus highlighting their extreme vulnerability under the pessimistic sea-level-rise (SLR) scenario (Ochanda, V;2017). In Rio de Janeiro, for example, an analysis on the city vulnerability by the 2080s indicates that almost 7.7% of the city area is highly vulnerable to impacts of climate change (Mandarino; F 2017). The case is not very different from Buenos Aires where more than 90% of the population is living in urban agglomerations, with a temperature increase on 10C posing a threat to the highly urbanized city hence heightening the delicate balance and importance of climate change adaptation in cities (Camillioni, C;2017). The challenges in cities to impacts of climate change are exacerbated by populations living in these cities. The simulation findings for Mombasa city indicate that exposure level to the 1:100 storm surge at 4m elevation falls between 433,300 and 2.5 million people and over US$9.1 billion in assets exposed by 2090. Under RCP 8.5 (pessimistic-scenario) for Lamu Island, the exposure level of between 37,200 and 480,400 people and over US$ 648 million in infrastructure/assets exposed by 2090. This, therefore, means that the planning of cities and its development control are key in climate change adaptation, mitigation as well as protecting infrastructure from these cities from impacts of climate change.
    Theme 2
    Where
    Salon 6

  • 11:00 - 11:30
    Organisation: UN Environment
    Media Opportunities
    Where
    Room 4, Level Meeting

  • 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
    The Integrated Urban Weather, Environment and Climate Services (IUWECS) is a new initiative from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) that seeks to provide science-based integrated urban services supporting safe, healthy and resilient cities. As part of that initiative, a Guide for IUWECS is being developed. The CitiesIPCC conference provides an excellent opportunity to present and receive feedback from attendees on the guide because the conference falls within the period for open community review. The intent of the IUWECS Guide is to document the best available knowledge, technologies and practices for producing and providing the relevant services that cities require to respond to the hazards posed by climate change. Such services include a combination of dense observation networks, high-resolution forecasts, multi-hazard early warning systems, and climate services. These services should assist cities in setting and implementing mitigation and adaptation strategies, which will enable the building of resilient and thriving cities that promote the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The Guide also plans to include a multidisciplinary approach to better serve the social-economic needs of urban areas, and identify the required partnerships to establish and sustain urban services, including research, city governments, international organizations, and private sector stakeholders. The session presentations will illustrate the best available knowledge/technologies and practices. Feedback will be obtained from participants on desired services, products and requirements for developing effective multidisciplinary partnerships among urban/city governments with meteorological and other key agencies.
    Theme 2
    Where
    Salon 8

  • 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
    In the last decade, cities have increasingly elected to make commitments to reduce the impacts of climate change. The recent launch of the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy (GCoM) solidifies a framework to bring the contributions of cities and local governments under the umbrella of the UNFCCC. The aim is to assess the impact of city and local government efforts to advance the Paris Agreement, while also identifying areas where they could do more through collaboration and with support from other levels of government and the private sector. A key to success for cities is to increase the engagement of the science community with a broad range of actors including local and national governments as well as city networks and the international coalitions working to support cities. In order to be successful, they need support in tracking their progress and being able to compare their hard work and results to other cities. There is deep value in local, regional and global perspective on these issues, in the form of outcome analyses from cities that share similar characteristics, such as environments, size or economic interests. These data can be centralized under the NAZCA platform under the UNFCCC, which offers promise as an open and accessible database that can improve from expanded data access, data standardization, and robust analysis. The work that each of these actors undertakes is incredibly important and continues to need coordination in an increasingly synergistic fashion in order to produce actionable outcomes and knowledge for cities. Standardization of data and a global, annual, analysis of action can accelerate and mobilize actions towards achieving GHG mitigation goals, and thus catalyze NDC ambition with transparent methodologies on data collection and analyses that are validated from the wider community, resulting in being able to understand the contributions of various subnational actors in calculating overall NDC progress. The goal of this panel is to bring focused attention to the information gap between knowledge and practice of city data with emphasis on how cities need to be supported by policy makers, science researchers and urban practitioners to achieve their goals. The participants will give brief overviews of their efforts in this field and then will convene as part of an interactive round table that hopes to inspire thoughtful exchange and vibrant interaction from the audience, aiming to further the understanding of best practices for city data aggregation through a forum with a diverse panel with unique perspectives.
    Theme 2
    Where
    Salon 9

  • 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
    This session is a collaborative time for stakeholders from diverse sectors and geographies to discuss the role data and research can play in increasing resilience in vulnerable communities. Experts from four global regions representing cities, NGOs and analytic technology will share their experiences, for better and worse, in the application of data in the pursuit of enhanced resilience. Perspectives from Latin America, Asia, Africa, and North America will be represented, and topics covered include stakeholder engagement, analytics, working in developing countries and navigating data gaps. Following these sharings, attendees will have 60 minutes to share their own perspectives and experiences and discover collaboration opportunities in round-table sessions
    Theme 2
    Where
    Salon 10

  • 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
    Urbanization and climate change are on a trajectory that poses both unprecedented risks to food, energy and water (FEW) systems and populations securities, and compelling opportunities to create more sustainable and fair futures. With climate change already affecting urban systems, and projected to underpin future challenges, scholars and practitioners have underscored the need to understand the hazards these cities face as the climate changes, how these affect the FEW security of populations, and how we can mainstream urban governance to better adapt to and mitigate climate risks. The session includes a diversity of case studies, perspectives and lessons-learned on the social-ecological and governance factors making FEW systems and populations vulnerable. Of equal importance will be to analyze how inequalities in risks are framed, and what are cities doing to incorporate equity considerations into urban adaptation and risk mitigation. For instance, do best practices exist that can be applied in different settings?
    Theme 2
    Where
    Salon 11

  • 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
    9 speakers, 1 rapporteur, 1 convener
    Theme 2
    Where
    Salon 12

  • 11:30 - 12:00
    Organisation: International Resource Panel, hosted by UN Environment
    Media Opportunities
    Where
    Room 4, Meeting Level

  • 12:00 - 12:30
    The UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) mobilizes global scientific and technological expertise to promote practical problem solving for sustainable development. The SDSN has operated under the auspices of the UN Secretary- General since 2012. We are committed to supporting the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the municipal, national, and global scales. This year, SDSN will be launching a new National Network for Canada. This Network will be hosted by the Waterloo University and the Waterloo Global Science Initiative. Both institutions have a strong determination to address complex problems through knowledge and innovation. The launch is scheduled for May 7-8 and will gather participants from different sectors in a High Level series of events. The President of the University of Waterloo described the talent and enthusiasm with which this University is facing the launch of this network: “Encouraged by a distinctly entrepreneurial culture, Waterloo students, alumni and researchers are widely known for coming up with big ideas, creating products that solve problems and making the world a better place.” Canada ranks 17 in last year’s SDG Index showing remarkable performance in the dashboards in goals such as SDG3 (Good Health and Wellbeing) and SDG4 (Quality Education). In this report, we can also see how Canada needs to improve its performance in areas such as SDG12 (Responsible Consumption and Production), SDG13 (Climate Action) and SDG15 (Life on Land). The 2018 budget, announced late February, proposes an investment $1.3 billion over 5 years to conserve land, waterways and wildlife and protect species at risk. This is a great piece of news that can help Canada get on route to achieving SDG15.
    Media Opportunities
    Where
    Room 4, Meeting Level

  • 12:30 - 13:00
    Organisation: Urban Climate Change Research Network (UCCRN)
    Media Opportunities
    Where
    Room 4, Meeting Level

  • 13:30 - 15:00
    The recent push to incorporate green infrastructure and now nature-based solutions into city-making has resulted in a plethora of research and demonstration projects in cities globally. The responses are proving to be a useful catalyst of research-practice partnerships as knowledge and expertise is rapidly evolving, and there is demand for innovation and experimentation that off-the-shelf or best-practice approaches cannot satisfy. However, there are many challenges for these partnerships – green infrastructure and nature-based solutions are inherently transdisciplinary with social, political, ecological and technical dimensions, while both research and municipalities/agencies are heavily siloed organisations. The reward systems for research and practice are often poorly aligned, meaning the success of partnerships is often based on individual relationships rather than institutionalised processes. The timeframes that research and practice operate are often very different – research often takes years while practice demand responses within months. Nature-based solutions are co-created and co-produced solutions. The nature-based solution approach is a new concept and the phrase is not widely used, but this will change in the coming years, as society seeks to effectively tackle environmental issues through and for innovation. Nature-based solutions and green infrastructure can provide an entry point to addressing all urban challenges. This session will bring a range of researchers and city practitioners to share their experiences and learnings of fostering research-practice partnerships from successful (and perhaps unsuccessful) nature-based climate adaptation projects together to present a framework for measuring the impacts of nature-based solutions. It will be of interest to practitioners, scientists and early career researchers who can contribute to the discussion, meet the key actors in nature-based solution research and innovation. It will also be of interest to practitioners, designers and planers who will get an opportunity to meet the early adopters of the concept. There will be a robust participatory discussion, inviting audience participation, to identify key challenges and opportunities for researchers and cities using green infrastructure and nature-based solutions for climate adaptation. 
    Theme 3
    Where
    Salon 8

  • 13:30 - 15:00
    This session presents several approaches to solving the complex problem of decreasing urban GHG emissions. Each speaker will discuss a technology, method, or program that has demonstrated potential to increase urban energy efficiency or effect behavioral change. The approaches presented in this session aim to contribute to an overall scalable shift in the way urban infrastructure is designed, built, and managed with a goal of reducing the impact cities have on climate change. Topics in this session include: • Discussion of the benefits of using Building Information Management (BIM) methods as a virtual real time decision-making tool for designing efficient and affordable buildings. • Improving urban planning by decentralizing information exchange, initiating and sustaining multi-directional dialogs through the use of Web 2.0 communication platforms. • Use of sensors and user-designed information communication technology to provide high-resolution data that incentivizes energy efficient behaviors in low-middle income neighborhoods in Managua, Nicaragua. • Numerical simulation and optimization of passive Phase Change Materials (PCM) in residential and commercial buildings to improve cooling and heating efficiency, thereby reducing CO2 emissions. • Efforts by a provincial alliance to promote smart city technologies and a specific polytechnic applied research initiative that aims to help industry and municipalities explore optimal use of distributed energy resources (solar photovoltaic, battery storage, combined heat and power, wind) to modernize electric utilities.
    Theme 3
    Where
    Salon 6

  • 13:30 - 15:00
    Currently an increasing number of cities (Reckien et al., 2015, Grafakos et al., 2017) are moving towards addressing climate change adaptation and mitigation in an integrated manner. Local governments urgently seek support and guidance, but the interrelationships (synergies and conflicts) between Ad-Mit is a relatively recent topic of research. This session will stimulate discussions between policy-makers, practitioners and academics in order to elucidate current understanding and define the most pressing urban Ad-Mit interrelationships topics to be analysed in future research.
    Theme 3
    Where
    Salon 5

  • 13:30 - 15:00
    UN agencies identify the need for rapid transition to high performance buildings as highlighted in this statement by UN Deputy Secretary General, Amina Mohammed. Since the increasing majority of buildings are urban, urban research and regulatory initiatives are most pertinent. This session addresses all four conference themes by combing academic research with successful implementation strategies. Presenters will: Highlight effective strategies for cities; Present a tool for modelling and tracking urban emissions; Describe solutions for the transition to low carbon and resilient cities; Enable transformative climate action while realizing collateral benefits
    Theme 3
    Where
    Salon 9

  • 13:30 - 15:00
    The session brings together practitioners and academics from across the globe to discuss inclusive approaches to mitigate and adapt to climate change. Looking at the theme through the interdisciplinary lens of practice, science and policy advocacy, the panelists aim to address gaps in urban development policies and propose more sustainable, equitable and efficient planning frameworks. They will discuss studies from Asia, Latin America and the Arab region to present their unique environmental and socio-economic conditions that require bespoke solutions reflecting their developmental needs as well as climate change response agendas. Emerging economies, particularly, are under tremendous pressure to provide adequate affordable housing and infrastructure in their urban centres but conventional city planning is often found myopic and with a top down approach. The natural expansion of informal settlements provides a solution in the form of incremental housing with cheap rentals though they are excluded from their government's policy response. The panel will discuss the climate-smart attributes of these self-built neighborhoods which also help meet their socio-economic needs, with a focus on the need for building on their resilience for an urban transformation.
    Theme 3
    Where
    Salon 10

  • 13:30 - 15:00
    Urban Heat Island Effect (5-6 participants) at Salon 11
    Theme 3
    Where
    Salon 11

  • 13:30 - 15:00
    Urban planners, policy makers, and others are beginning to recognize the need to urgently achieve significant absolute reductions in energy and material consumption to avoid the already palpable risks of dangerous climate and related ecological change. Given the role that cities play as crucibles for consumerist lifestyles, communities in both the global North and South will need to implement measures that go beyond customary emphases on “smart cities,” “greening” the economy, resource efficiency, renewable energy, and technological innovation. The latter conventional interventions tend to be politically palatable but typically generate perverse rebound effects and have other untoward impacts. In addition, cities are manifestly reliant on precarious supply chains for goods and vast hinterlands for the appropriation of energy and disposal of wastes. These circumstances raise profound questions for current conceptions of “sustainable cities” and the cultural constructs that underpin prevailing modes of urban living. To pursue answers to these questions we need to formulate more encompassing strategies toward sustainable cities, to include the underlying systems of social organization and associated configurations that enable the co-existence of dense aggregations of people. This challenge cannot be pursued by researchers or policy makers strictly on a top-down basis and primarily through technological innovation. Rather, effective measures will need to be undergirded by credible physical and social sciences and engineering while also entailing intensive processes of co-production of knowledge, transdisciplinary engagement, and higher order learning processes.
    Theme 3
    Where
    Salon 12

  • 15:15 - 16:45
    Cities are expressing interest in a number of sustainability outcomes, ranging from carbon mitigation, resource efficiency, health, equity, and disaster resilience, among others indicated in the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. Increasingly, many cities are recognizing that while in-boundary activities and impacts are important, tracking the transboundary performance of urban infrastructure systems using approaches such as Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), supply chain analysis, environmental footprinting and disaster response modeling is critical to achieving multiple sustainability outcomes. This session will present an overview of the science and the practice of assessing multiple sustainability outcomes in cities with focus on urban infrastructure, presenting both research advances and city-application examples. The session will be largely discussion focused, and organized in two rounds: Round 1: What transboundary life cycle based tools are cities using to assess different aspects of sustainability? Round 2: What is the science of  addressing health and resilience outcomes in cities ? Are these linked with other sustainability outcomes in cities?
    Theme 3
    Where
    Salon 5

  • 15:15 - 16:45
    The recent push to incorporate green infrastructure and now nature-based solutions into city-making has resulted in a plethora of research and demonstration projects in cities globally. The responses are proving to be a useful catalyst of research-practice partnerships as knowledge and expertise is rapidly evolving, and there is demand for innovation and experimentation that off-the-shelf or best-practice approaches cannot satisfy. However, there are many challenges for these partnerships – green infrastructure and nature-based solutions are inherently transdisciplinary with social, political, ecological and technical dimensions, while both research and municipalities/agencies are heavily siloed organisations. The reward systems for research and practice are often poorly aligned, meaning the success of partnerships is often based on individual relationships rather than institutionalised processes. The timeframes that research and practice operate are often very different – research often takes years while practice demand responses within months. Nature-based solutions are co-created and co-produced solutions. The nature-based solution approach is a new concept and the phrase is not widely used, but this will change in the coming years, as society seeks to effectively tackle environmental issues through and for innovation. Nature-based solutions and green infrastructure can provide an entry point to addressing all urban challenges. This session will bring a range of researchers and city practitioners to share their experiences and learnings of fostering research-practice partnerships from successful (and perhaps unsuccessful) nature-based climate adaptation projects together to present a framework for measuring the impacts of nature-based solutions. It will be of interest to practitioners, scientists and early career researchers who can contribute to the discussion, meet the key actors in nature-based solution research and innovation. It will also be of interest to practitioners, designers and planers who will get an opportunity to meet the early adopters of the concept. There will be a robust participatory discussion, inviting audience participation, to identify key challenges and opportunities for researchers and cities using green infrastructure and nature-based solutions for climate adaptation.
    Theme 3
    Where
    Salon 8

  • 15:15 - 16:45
    Globally the building sector is the largest energy-consuming sector, accounting for over 1/3 of final energy consumption and an equally important source of CO2 emissions. While cost-effective technologies are available to transform the buildings sector, a wide range of barriers related to market, behaviors, and political institutions create a complex and difficult context for adoption. In addition, buildings and their energy supply are embedded in wider urban systems. Overcoming lock-in of existing infrastructure requires consideration of this interdependency with other subsystems. Thus, integrative city-scale solutions are needed to address the motivations of multiple levels of government, and mobilize a diverse range of stakeholders within the city. This calls for a new role for local governments to integrate both vertically with higher orders of government, as well as horizontally with key private and institutional building stakeholders within the city. This session will look at commercial, residential and institutional building sectors and the wider urban energy system in which they operate. The session will highlight barriers hindering progress in the buildings sector, and explore the potential roles for local government in mobilizing innovative governance solutions across scales to stimulate accelerated uptake of low carbon technologies and behaviors.
    Theme 3
    Where
    Salon 6

  • 15:15 - 16:45
    The efforts of cities to mitigate and adapt to climate change will play a key role in the endeavor to achieve the SDGs. However, it has been argued that long-term success in mitigation and adaptation will only be possible through deep systemic shifts in cities, i.e. through transformation. The session therefore analyses the nexus of urban climate action and SDGs and debates opportunities but also barriers for transformation. Based on presentations from different projects around the world, an emphasis is on the synergies as well as potential trade offs between mitigation, adaptation and development goals.
    Theme 3
    Where
    Salon 9

  • 15:15 - 16:45
    The session explores the kinds of engagements, relationships and social innovations needed to further understand and strengthen climate resilience in cities, especially those grappling with inequality and marginalization. Drawing on experiences from the cities of Aberdeen, Bristol, Cape Town, Durban, Harare, Iwaki, Long Beach, Lusaka, São Paulo, Victoria, Windhoek and Yubari, the session discusses key features of the urban climate governance and social innovation research frontier. Research challenges and gaps elaborated through the session contributions include: value-based identities, motivations, power and politics; hybrid positionalities; knowledge co-production; social mobilisation; collective action; and translating the concept of transformation into practice in the climate change arena. The notion of ‘boundary spanning’ is used as a framing device to talk across and relate between the research and practices being presented in this session. Boundary spanning entails communicating, engaging and acting across organisations and social groupings to addressing complex problems in innovative ways. It requires understanding and navigating different values, motivations, interests, roles and power differences to foster alliances and collaborative actions across organizational and societal boundaries to address climate change in cities.
    Theme 3
    Where
    Salon 10

  • 15:15 - 16:45
    Is short traveled knowledge the answer for transformation? - Come join us for input on the theories behind transformation of local societies and get great examples of urban mobility challenges. You will also get the chance to contribute with your own knowledge and experience in our world café where you can discuss about themes like: What knowledge do we have concerning urban mobility that we can build on - practice and scientifically? Where are the major knowledge gaps in the scientific literature/data in urban mobility? What are the major challenges for the future urban mobility? In what aspects of urban mobility do we need more co-designed and co-produced knowledge leading to effective and inclusive urban practices? How can we better achieve a cross-country/ cross-region understanding of urban mobility? Where in the process from idea/technical development to implementation are the main obstacles for developing future urban mobility?
    Theme 3
    Where
    Salon 11

  • 15:15 - 16:45
    Transformative climate action in cities requires active participation of citizens. Individuals need to take actions to mitigate and cope with climate change, and accept policy to promote climate action. Therefore, it is key to understand what motivates citizens to take and accept climate action, so that effective and acceptable urban policy can be implemented that encourage and enable citizens to take and support climate action. Social science knowledge is pivotal to address these issues. We discuss how to strengthen the synergy between policy makers, practitioners and academics. What can be learned from each other, and how can we use such integrative knowledge to develop effective, efficient and acceptable climate policy? To illustrate the added value of such collaborations, we present recent projects to understand and promote climate action in the city of Groningen, the Netherlands – host of the Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation. We highlight important lessons learned, and ways to strengthen collaboration between academics, practitioners, citizens, and urban policy making communities across the world, and identify important input for the IPCC AR6 cycle.
    Theme 3
    Where
    Salon 12

  • 18:00 - 20:30
    For those attending the conference, this event is included in your registration and bus shuttles will be available.
    Where
    Rogers Place - Bus Shuttles Provided

  • 08:00 - 08:30
    The first 21 events of the 2018 Cities and Regions Talanoa Dialogues are being released at the CitiesIPCC Conference in Edmonton, including the Canadian Cities and Regions Talanoa Dialogues to be held by ICLEI, the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and the Ville de Montréal at the ICLEI World Congress in Montreal on 19-22 June 2018. These dialogues will bring all levels of government together through in-country dialogues to shape and implement climate action.
    Media Opportunities
    Where
    Room 4, Meeting Level

  • 08:30 - 09:00
    Presentation of "The Science We need for the Cities we want: working together to implement the global research agenda on cities and climate change", a statement of collaboration by the organizing partners of the Cities and Climate Change Science Conference. On the last day the CitiesIPCC Cities and Climate Change Science Conference in Edmonton, 10 of the leading urban and scientific global organizations will present "The Science We need for the Cities we want: working together to implement the global research agenda on cities and climate change", a joint statement describing how they will work together to support the implementation the global research agenda on cities and climate change. Convened by: C40, Cities Alliance, ICLEI, Future Earth, SDSN, UN-Environment, UN-Habitat, UCLG, WCRP.
    Media Opportunities
    Where
    Room 4, Meeting Level

  • 09:00 - 10:30
    Climate action in cities will take place in a context of a diversity of social, environment, economic, and development objectives. The transformative climate change action discussed throughout the conference will require enabling conditions. These enabling conditions or feasibility will require consideration of short and long term requirements and will be made possible through the development of new knowledge and action. What are the innovative enabling practices/approaches/policy instrument/capacity building that might work best? Transformative climate actions should address poverty and inequity, re-shaping of power relations, and re-conceptualizing visions of what cities are, could be, and should be. The keynote presentation will examine overarching insights of enabling transformative climate actions in cities with examples of policies and practices including issue of planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Respondents will further explore knowledge gaps on how to enable transformative change and the key opportunities for research and practice advancement within the broader context of the Paris Agreement, the New Urban Agenda, the Sustainable Development Goals, and the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. The role of the individual, finance and investment, engagement of local interests and climate activism, and urban technological prospects will be explored.
    Theme 4
    Where
    Hall D

  • 11:00 - 12:30
    This panel examines interactions, legislations, new ways of coordinating and mobilizing resources, and new frameworks and technical capacities for decision making through a survey of implementation practices and opportunities that span cities and their peri-urban areas. Particular attention is paid to the opportunities and challenges for moving beyond ‘assessments’ and towards the actual implementation of local actions in support of climate resilient urban development. The operating and implementation systems include environmental, political and social boundaries and opportunities for climate change action. The panel examines a framework for processes in planning decisions for environmentally sustainable and climate-adapted futures. Additionally, we explore multiple key challenges and hurdles for effective climate governance in the cities in Peshawar Valley of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK), Pakistan with a focus on the adaptation initiatives taken in the Valley. Attention is also given to the development of community-based urban resilience and climate action plans. The panel relates a range of innovative practices, experiments, and ideas from around the globe – such as regionalism in California, planning within planetary boundaries, transnational networks across Asia and Europe, community-based strategies in Denmark and Indonesia, a toolkit to support urban adaptation processes in Germany – that are leading to the emergence of new urban actors, spaces, and political dynamics enabling structural transformations towards low carbon and climate resilient cities.
    Theme 4
    Where
    Salon 5

  • 11:00 - 12:30
    Through city networks and M&R platforms such as the Covenant of Mayors and the Carbon Climate Registry, cities all over the world are reporting their GHG emissions and reduction targets. This session aims at i) presenting recent research outcomes based on the data provided by cities through M&R platforms, ii) identifying data challenges to scientific research related to the aggregate emission impact of urban areas, and iii) proposing solutions for data gaps and research. These topics will be addressed by speakers representing academia, M&R platforms, and city networks. Particular attention will be given to the importance of the monitoring and reporting according to recognized protocols and how collaborative research by academia, practitioners, and policymakers can guide policy making and practice. The session will also address the results achieved by the Covenant of Mayors’ signatories at the projected GHG emissions reduction by 2030, and the new Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy as well its preliminary aggregation results up to 2050.
    Theme 4
    Where
    Salon 8

  • 11:00 - 12:30
    An enhanced building retrofit scenario shows potential for creation of over 1 million jobs sustained over the period 2015-2030 in the European Union and approximately 1.5 million in North America. Under an enhanced bus networks scenario, this can lead to the prevention of over 3,000 premature deaths per year in North America and over 40,000 premature deaths per year in Latin America, prevent over 2,500 fatalities per year in North America and over 70,000 fatalities per year in Latin America and reduce the commute times of the average public transport user by 9-10%. The session and the findings presented by three researchers directly addresses some of the key barriers for the integration of wider impacts and benefits into sector-level planning in cities. The work represents a first step in an effort to make these impacts and benefits, and the tools for their evaluation, more understandable and accessible to decision makers and researchers. The audience is encouraged to engage in, criticise and further build upon the methodologies and results, and to make use of the content where possible as a tool for moving towards more holistic and participatory planning for sustainable development in cities.
    Theme 4
    Where
    Salon 9

  • 11:00 - 12:30
    What does the transition to a 1.5 C City look like (6-7 participants) at Salon 12
    Theme 4
    Where
    Salon 12

  • 11:00 - 12:30
    This panel provides a contemporary survey of the spectrum of financial products and delivery models that are shaping the emerging climate adaptation finance discourse. Collectively, the presentations represent two distinct challenges. One challenge is defined by the mainstreaming of adaptation considerations into known units of risk-adjusted financial products. Whether it is through strategic leverage or the modification of underwriting criteria, mature financial service delivery models themselves are challenged to advance institutional adaptation that accounts for not only the uncertainty of climate change but also the opportunities. The second challenge and corresponding sub-theme reflects the desire to co-align financial and social capital at local scales that are arguably more appropriate for addressing local vulnerability and local determination as to the forms and timing of future adaptations. Through an exploration of empirical knowledge of ongoing adaptation in agriculture, energy and financial services, this sub-theme offers insight into not only alternative delivery models but a range of alternative criteria for underwriting the “upside” or “returns” of financial investments. Both sub-themes are united in advancing practices that identify trade-offs and substitutes that reflect an accounting of co-benefits or conflicts that may arise from such investments. This panel provides a critical evaluation of the challenges facing urban adaptation finance.
    Theme 4
    Where
    Salon 10

  • 11:00 - 12:30 - 12:30
    With 90% of urban population growth until 2050 projected in Asia and Africa, many cities and much of future urban growth is and will continue to be characterised by informal settlement, unplanned urban expansion, incremental development and livelihoods reliant on the informal economy. As both climate change and urban growth accelerate in the Global South, discussions on the transformative action required to address these dual challenges while still advancing the achievement of all Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are an increasingly urgent priority. The session will address Conference Theme 4 on “Transformative Action for climate change” by sharing innovative practices and technological solutions from the informal sector. The session will also provide examples of how transformative climate action rooted in the informal sector is critical for addressing poverty and inequality, and how people who live in informal settlements and participate in the informal economy can re-shape the power relations to create the new vision for what a climate-compatible, equitable, resilient and inclusive city needs and should look like.
    Theme 4
    Where
    Salon 11

  • 13:30 - 15:00
    Carbon lock-in refers to the inertia of carbon emissions due to mutually reinforcing physical, economic, and social constraints from existing technologies, institutions, and behavioral norms. Together, these conditions and path dependencies act to constrain the rate and magnitude of carbon emissions reductions in the coming decades. Nowhere is carbon lock-in more evident than in urban areas, where buildings, transportation infrastructure, and the layout of the street network and the size of the city blocks, result in significant inertia and lock in energy demand for long time. The infrastructure and technology used in cities exhibit long lifespans and result in a long series of behavioral lock-in. The long-lasting legacy of urban form is evident in cities around the world, with examples of spatial patterns dating back hundreds to thousands of years. This panel will discuss the key types of carbon lock-in and the opportunities and strategies for breaking out of carbon lock-in in cities. Panelists include scholars and practitioners with special focus on opportunities and challenges in China and India.
    Theme 4
    Where
    Salon 5

  • 13:30 - 15:00
    In this session, the historical processes of climate issues integration in the planning policies of five cities are confronted. The selected cities, Arhem in The Netherlands, Honk Kong in China, Salvador in Brasil, Toulouse in France and Tunis in Tunisia, have in common that they are using or would use urban climate maps (Ren et al., 2011) as a tool to communicate and to integrate local and regional climate information into operational urban planning tools. Urban climate maps can reflect the conditions in different climate types so that specific recommendation can be derived. This cartographic formalization of climate data developed by the urban climate research community, often in collaboration with urban practitioners, seems to be an effective strategy in the initiation of climatic awareness at the urban scale. Furthermore, production of knowledge in adjacent domains which falls within the human and social sciences, such as the analysis of the regulatory framework and the governance systems, not only can booster the integration process, but also bring to light levers and brakes to this integration.   Putting into perspective five cases of cities from the North and the South, the session aims to draw lessons about methods and tools used in environmental or human and social sciences that can be mobilized to initiate climatic awareness in urban policies. From the first steps of Tunis to confirmed experiments such as Honkg-Kong, through cities where the integration effort is under way without affecting local action, the aim is to share knowledge and experiences on ways to promote climate-friendly urban planning practices.
    Theme 4
    Where
    Salon 8

  • 13:30 - 15:00
    The urban National Determined Contributions (NDCs) community is a coalition ready to accelerate climate action before 2020 and beyond between civil society, the scientific community, the private sector and all levels of government, including cities and regions. The inclusion of urban related content in NDCs is encouraging given urbanization trends across the world. Are the most rapidly urbanizing regions of African and Asian address urban issues in their NDCs and to what extent? The results are especially encouraging for the future development of inclusive, resilient and sustainable cities, considering the fast urbanizing regions and expected future the urban growth. Furthermore the session will discuss the NDCs focus, whether is on adaptation or mitigation or generally more balanced. Moreover, one important related issue that this event will address is the integration of local and regional climate action into NDCs. The panelists/presenters will discuss how research can support the implementation of a minded NDC partnership in relation to urban adaptation under the overall umbrella of vertical integration . The topic is highly relevant for LDCs and SIDS. The last part of the session will consolidate the results and outcomes of the presentations and discussions into further research opportunities and gaps.
    Theme 4
    Where
    Salon 6

  • 13:30 - 15:00
    The transformative potential of cities in pursuing a global target of limiting mean temperature rise to 1.5C represents a source of much hope and optimism. City-networks including, inter alia, C40, ICLEI, and the Climate Alliance are working to fostering transnational city coordination; meta-networks like the Global Covenant of Mayors for Energy and Climate have been forged to link cities together in a more comprehensive manner; smaller initiatives like the Climate Neutral Cities Alliance are working to stimulate holistic sustainability transitions in, and across, a select number of urban settings, and; global initiatives have emerged in the form of the New Urban Agenda and the urban SDGs. Cities are, in other words, more ambitious and more globally engaged than they have ever been. Yet it remains unclear whether, how, and with what effects they can coordinate their actions to achieve such meaningful collective and global impact. On the question of global urban coordination we want to use this session to highlight and organize a focused discussion around three important themes prevalent in contemporary academic and policy research: (1) The interaction of networked city initiatives, and questions related to assessing linkages and relationships (consolidation, competition, formal or informal coordination) between them in what is now a relatively robust governance domain; (2) The impact of domestic contexts and institutional/political configurations on enabling transformative networked urban governance across national contexts, and; (3) The local impacts and implications as increasingly well-networked global urban efforts are translated back into particular urban contexts, especially with respect to the relationship between urban transformation and questions of equity, participation, and development. Each of these constitute separate research agendas yet all are linked together by a common interest in better understanding how, and with what implications, cities are contributing to the global objective of 1.5C.
    Theme 4
    Where
    Salon 11

  • 13:30 - 15:00
    This session will open with a keynote presentation on the most promising instruments to raise and steer investment towards lower-carbon forms of urban development. The speaker will highlight the crucial importance of enhancing financial maturity at all levels of government and in the domestic private sector (e.g. local commercial banks). He will further emphasise the need to create regulatory frameworks and adopt financing mechanisms that deliver low-carbon outcomes – such as energy-efficient building codes, congestion pricing and land value capture. The event then brings together practitioners, donors and researchers to discuss how urban finance systems can be strengthened and adapted to unlock the resources needed for climate action. It will not look narrowly at the capacities of city governments, but more broadly at the ways that national governments and private firms enable or constrain investment in climate-positive urban infrastructure The panel will focus on low- and lower middle-income countries, which often lack the capacities and frameworks needed for cities to act effectively. Nonetheless, there are a few pioneering cities and states that offer important lessons into financing urban climate action, such as Kampala, Durban, Rosario, Mumbai, Nairobi and Ahmedabad. 
    Theme 4
    Where
    Salon 12

  • 13:30 - 15:00
    The primary goal of this project was to allow students to share and discuss the impacts, lessons, and experiences of climate change in their homes, local communities, and urban centres; and then relay the ways in which they are uniquely adapting and responding to these challenges. After engaging in global conversations, the youth participants identified various risks and vulnerabilities they face, commonalities and differences, and established a framework of meaningful priorities, policies, and calls to action for systemic initiatives in addressing climate change, with a particular lens to education, educational frameworks, and the opportunities and challenges therein. As a result of this three-month, intensive partnership, an international delegation of youth from the participating cities met in Edmonton, and between February 28 - March 5, 2018, they produced a ‘Whitepaper on Climate Change,’ which will be presented in this conference session. Following introduction and the Whitepaper presentation, we will engage session participants in a ‘World Café’ to cultivate deep, rich conversations around issues that genuinely matter to a community of scholars sharing similar interest and passion.
    Theme 4
    Where
    Salon 10

  • 13:30 - 15:00 - 15:00
    Cities and urban areas across the world face significant risks from climate change and are increasingly taking an active role in formulating, implementing and financing climate change adaptation (Revi et al. 2014). In rapidly growing economies in the global South, urban adaptation action is inextricably linked with goals of ensuring sustainable development and mitigating disaster risk (Revi, 2016). Given the nature of this adaptation-development spectrum (Singh, Gajjar, & Deshpande, 2016), in practice, adaptation actions are undertaken by multiple actors, at different scales; mediated by diverse institutional arrangements; and reflect different agendas and visions of what effective adaptation and sustainable urban development mean. The session will have four speakers’ present cases on diverse imaginations and practices of urban adaptation from cities of the global south: Chennai (India), Kampala (Uganda), Cape Town (South Africa) and Bengaluru (India). Rooted in robust empirical evidence, the cases highlight how adaptation across cities is mediated by different actors with multiple and often competing agendas, and varied formal and informal institutional arrangements.
    Theme 4
    Where
    Salon 9

  • 15:30  - 16:30
    To help inform evidence-based policy development on climate change and cities we require improved monitoring systems within cities. This session will explore the (i) data requirements to understand GHG emissions, climate risks, socio-economic contexts and other issues; (ii) data infrastructure required to gather, manage, interpret and disseminate this information; (iii) local, regional and global mechanisms to facilitate systematic sharing of knowledge and experiences on climate strategies; (iv) practical, financial, and ethical considerations of such systems. Following a review of key issues, we will break into small groups to discuss these issues. This session therefore contributes directly to Objective 7 of the conference (https://citiesipcc.org/about/objectives/)
    Where
    Hall D

  • 15:30  - 16:30
    Developing a future research agenda on cities and climate change is a complex task. Setting out to co-design this research agenda across the science, policy, and practice communities makes it daunting task, but one that must occur. This session will open with an overview of a recently published Nature Comment entitled “Six Research Priorities for Cities and Climate” authored by members of the CitiesIPCC Scientific Steering Committee. Following the opening presentation, a panel of scientists, policy makers, and practitioners will build upon the Nature Comment and discuss the opportunities and challenges of designing and implementing a new cities and climate change research agenda that brings together science, policy, and practice.
    Where
    Salon 8

  • 18:00 - 18:30
    Media Opportunities
    Where
    Hall D

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